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Rockpool exploration in Jersey

March 24th, 2012
blue sponge beneath a rock near seymour tower jersey

Cobalt blue sponge "terpios fugax"

Turn over a rock near Seymour Tower on one of our guided “moonwalks” in Jersey and you never know what you may find. For anyone who is fascinated by marine biology in Jersey this is a great place to explore on the big low tides.

Today the sun was out and we had a small group of walkers so there was more time to explore beneath the rocks. 20 degrees in late March is pretty good for this time of year.

First find of the day was the Cobalt blue Sponge Terpios Fugax.

Then came a tiny black and white striped creature which took a while to identify but appears to be a Candy stripe flatworm, Prosthecraeus vittatus.

How does nature come to produce such remarkable life forms? This is described as the best looking of all the flatworms. Not being an expert on flatworms i’ll accept this description. It certainly looks impressive.

It is easily overlooked as it is only a few centimetres long. We only spotted it when we were checked the photos at home.

marine life in jersey 1

Candy stripe flatworm. What a wonderful name

Carnivorous, it feeds on small sea creatures such as sea squirts. Found in the south and west of UK.

Turn another rock and a couple of Chitons made an appearance. Chitons graze on microscopic algae on the rocks.

If you do turn over rocks always put them back so the marine life beneath the rock is protected form the sun and predators.

Time and tide was moving on and it was soon time for us to do the same.

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