Jersey Walk Adventures

Sunrise at Seymour tower jerseyLow water fishing in JerseyPraire, Venus Verrucosa or clamHeading out to Seymour tower, Jerseyview from Icho tower looking north towards Seymour towerSeymour towerSnakelock anemoneAdventure holidays in jerseyExploring the sea shoreSunrise in JerseySeymour JerseyWalking on the seabedSand bar on a walk to Icho towerMoonwalks to Seymour towerIcho tower, Jersey round towerSandbars at icho towerView towards Little Seymour, JerseyRounded rocks at ichoSeymour tower. Moonwalks. Guided walks on the seabed in JerseySearching for the vraicing marks near Seymour tower. The letter PMint sauce wormSeymour tower. Built in 1782Sponge
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Where we walk

Join Derek and Trudie on a guided walk on the seabed and explore this remarkable marine environment. Jersey has the largest rocky inter tidal area in Europe. This expanse is now an internationally recognized Ramsar Wetlands site and is the marine version of the Jersey National Park.

The Dates Page shows our full schedule.

Private and group walks on other dates can also be arranged (providing the tide is low enough).

Departure points

Map showing our guided walks departure points. The venue is confirmed when you book.

Advance booking is essential.

Seymour Tower. Walk on the Seabed

Walk on the seabed! Explore gullies, cross sand bars and rock pools on a walk to Seymour Tower (1 mile offshore).

Discover Jersey’s wilderness with local guides who are passionate about the area.

The walks are also called “Moonwalks” because of the lunar-like rock formations. However, this is not a sterile environment, it is full of marine and bird life and has a rich maritime history.

Escape the sounds and activities of everyday life and enter a place that is neither sea nor land.

Built in 1782, Seymour Tower dominates the Royal Bay of Grouville. The tower is surrounded by a mass of granite rocks and gullies that are home to a diverse range of marine creatures and birds.

The walk takes you across sand bars and into the gullies, which at low tide fall dry. Stand in places that within a few hours your footprints will be covered by up to 40 ft/12m of water as the ocean returns to reclaim its territory. This is why you should not venture into this lunar-like landscape without local knowledge or a guide.

Learn from local guides who have lived and walked in this area for many years about the maritime history and fishing activities. Perhaps observe low water fishermen and women searching for lobster, prawns and even the famous Jersey ormer.

Throughout the year discover fascinating marine creatures, sponges, sea lemons, anemones and a wide variety of shellfish and seaweed.

Twinkle, twinkle little star. Bioluminescence on a beach

As night descends, star-like shapes of bright green twinkle and sparkle in a few unique spots on the seabed at low tide to illuminate the sands at your feet. Few local people ever see -or even know about- these remarkable creatures.

Walk away from the street lights and explore a different world where stars sparkle above us and tiny creatures glow at your feet.

Full-Moon-Walk to Seymour Tower

Leave the lights of Jersey behind us as we stroll beneath the rays of the full moon across the seabed.

Join Derek and Trudie on a unique nighttime walk and walk 1 mile offshore to Seymour Tower.

As the tide recedes, walk in a seascape where the reflections of stars twinkle in the rock pools along with the occasional sparkle of bioluminescence*. Perhaps, on a clear night, catch a glimpse of a shooting star and the Milkyway.

At your feet, observe tiny marine creatures as they scurry about on nocturnal missions, while our figures cast moon shadows.

On the nights of a full moon, you may even be able to read a newspaper – though the marine life is perhaps more newsworthy!

*Note. Bioluminescence can be harder to see when it is a full moon. The best displays of bioluminescence choose our bioluminescence walks.

Icho Tower

Icho Tower is a very different experience to our Seymour Tower walk. It is only possible to visit this area on very low tides, and very few people ever discover the remarkable marine life in this area. It is rare to encounter more than a dozen people out low water fishing, catching lobster, prawns or shellfish.

Walk through sea gullies catching glimpses of panoramas that suddenly open up to reveal a mass of reefs and sandbars.

Join local guides who have fished and foraged in this area for many years.

“Having been brought up with Icho Tower on my doorstep, this is the area that most low water foragers consider to be Jersey’s best”. Derek Hairon.

Walk to the end of Jersey. Karame Beacon

Walk into a world of bright colours and sensations as we follow the tide almost 2 miles offshore to Karame Beacon and the Violet Bank.

On a very low tide walk to the edge of Jersey’s wilderness. Only the squawking of seagulls, the sound of the ocean and a stillness surround us in this exceptional area which is covered twice a day by some of the highest tides in the world (40ft).

Explore one of Europe’s most remarkable intertidal zones which is now an internationally recognised Ramsar wetlands site.

The Two Towers. A low tide exploration

Walk between Icho and Seymour Towers on the lowest tides of the year.

Few people experience the opportunity to walk between the two towers. Weave your way between rocks, sandbanks and rock pools accompanied by experienced local guides who have fished and lived on this coast for many years.

Perhaps meet people low water fishing for lobster and shellfish.

Wild Vegetables of the Ocean. Seaweed Foraging

Green, brown, delicate, bold and sometimes smelly – seaweeds often remain unnoticed and were often disregarded as useless. Today seaweeds are an essential ingredient in sushi, miso soup, jellies, sweets or squirty cream and Jersey has a long tradition of gathering seaweeds.

Discover their values on a gentle coastal walk with an expert Jersey resident.

The Oyster Trail

Stroll through the most extensive oyster beds in the British Isles. Hear about the modern cultivation of shellfish in Jersey and the remarkable history of the oyster fishery, which was a huge local industry in the 19th century.

Afterwards, sample fresh Jersey Oysters at Seymour Inn.

Sea Foraging & Oyster Trail with Bubbles

Jersey folk used to call it low water fishing. Today it’s called foraging.

Join us on a marine wild food foray as we stroll to the biggest oyster beds in the British Isles. Discover what you can forage from the sea and share stories of the 19th century Oyster fishing, Jersey’s version of a gold rush.

On the way, get to know the difference between Praires, Palourdes, Cockles and Clams. All are edible and have surprisingly different tastes.

To add a vegetable side dish to our walk, we’ll introduce you to a few edible seaweeds which often go unnoticed or disregarded as useless. They are, however, an essential ingredient in sushi, miso soup, jellies, sweets and even ice cream.

End the 2½ hour walk with fresh Jersey oysters and a glass of bubbly in Seymour Inn.

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